Relative clauses

Relative clauses
Relative clauses1

A relative clause is a type of dependent clause that modifies a noun or pronoun by providing additional information about it. Here is an overview of the key concepts related to relative clauses:

  1. Relative clauses: A relative clause is a type of dependent clause that modifies a noun or pronoun by providing additional information about it. A relative clause is typically introduced by a relative pronoun such as who, whom, whose, that, or which.
    Example: “The book, which was on the table, is mine.”
  2. Relative pronouns: A relative pronoun is a word that introduces a relative clause and connects it to the noun or pronoun it modifies. The relative pronouns are: who, whom, whose, that, and which.
  3. Defining and non-defining relative clauses: A relative clause can be defining or non-defining. A defining relative clause provides essential information to identify the noun or pronoun it modifies, while a non-defining relative clause provides additional information about the noun or pronoun.
    For example, “The woman who is wearing a red dress is my sister” is a defining clause, while “My sister, who is wearing a red dress, is an artist” is a non-defining clause.
  4. Contact clauses and non-contact clauses:
    Contact clauses are relative clauses that directly follow the noun or pronoun that they modify.
    Non-contact clauses, on the other hand, come later in the sentence, usually after other phrases or clauses.

    Practice: Practice is key to mastering relative clauses. Reviewing examples of relative clauses in texts you read, and practicing forming and using relative clauses in your own writing and speaking will help you to improve your skills over time.

Relative clauses can be a bit challenging to master, but with practice and study, you will be able to improve your understanding and ability to use these structures correctly. Remember that, as with many grammar concepts, practice is the best way to improve your understanding and to gain confidence in your ability to use relative clauses correctly.

Related Articles

Responses

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

ESL FYI We would like to show you notifications for the latest news and updates.
Dismiss
Allow Notifications